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Kindle Books Written by AIs Vol.2021.2

Published by marco on

This is the latest roundup of book titles that my Kindle shows me when I’m not reading it. Long ago, I considered paying to turn off this advertising, but it’s proven to be so entertaining that I’m happy I never gave in and did it. This is a view into what people are reading or what Amazon would like people to be reading or … whatever. I simply observe and catalog. I also sometimes have to hide my Kindle in public places so that no-one calls the police for what they think I’m reading.[1]

Chunkee Munkee: Volume 2

 Chunkee Munkee Volume 2

I don’t know what I missed in volume 1, but this volume promises,

“A look into a dysfunctional lifestyle that is of yourself or someone you know. Gain insight and be entertained in this fascinating book. Humor also.”

I assume that the misspelling in the title is significant, but the kerning of the double “Es” in a seemingly different font feels significant. Only the author “Madame Ex” knows, unless I take the opportunity to find out more.

I was tickled to see that the AI was worried that “gain[ing] insight”, “be[ing] entertained” and “fascinat[ed]” weren’t enough, so it threw in “Humor also” at the end, just to round up the more tenacious fence-sitters.

I can’t quite figure out the cover photo, though I think it might be a plant? But it kind of looks like a mouth? It’s…unsettling.

She’s the One

 She's the One

“Can this tenderhearted 13th-century woman raise a baby, placate an absent military husband, and help her sister save her homeland?”

First off: impeccable grammar and editing. This AI is definitely better at camouflage than those that came before it. The hyphen and the Oxford comma are noted and appreciated.

Is the title of the book “She’s the One Who Cares Too Much”? Or is it “”She’s the One”? Or is it “She’s the One: Who Cares Too Much”? Or what about “She’s the One: Who Cares? Too Much?”?

Please note that this is, tantalizingly, the second book in the well-known and easily remembered series “The War Stories of the Seven Troublesome Sisters”. It is a bit suspicious that there are no reviews of this book, though.

Perfect Game

 Perfect Game

This is a box set, so it’s three books in one! A bargain! They know it’s junk, but people can’t resist a bargain, so getting 3x junk for the same price is irresistable.

“Three men committed to bachelorhood… Three women determined to change everything.”

This one is refreshing in that it is absolutely unabashed about the relatively obvious fact that all three books are pretty much the same. The three books included in this collection are Catching Caden, Benching Brady, and Stealing Sawyer. This AI author seems to have hit on a winning formula, though: 394 perfect, 5-star reviews!

The books probably aren’t exactly the same. They feature a different cover model and probably each have unique vocabulary for describing throbbing members and how they’re wielded. The readers of these kinds of books are about as discriminating as people who order Back Door Babes XIV. They know what they’re getting; they know it’s the same thing as the first 13 times; they don’t care; that’s the way they like it.

Famously in Love

 Famously In Love

How do you avoid paying too much for your book cover? Use models in silhouette. They splashed out for two fonts for the title, though.

“A family oriented heartthrob. A driven nanny and dancer. Theirs is a sweet romance with touches of unexpected Hollywood turbulence.”

I only noticed this one because the author’s last name is “Chien”, which means “dog” in French. No hyphen in “family oriented”, sentences without verbs…I think this one is definitely an AI, lurking as an author.

The Pimple in My Dimple

 The Pimple in my Dimple

This one is refreshingly not a romance/softcore-porn novel. Either that or it’s very niche and even more disturbing than it appears at first.

“You may be unfamiliar with this antisocial genre. It’s called Cringe Poetry, and it is not for the easily offended or distressed.”

I don’t think this is an AI. I think this is a teenager challenging readers to be cool enough to get and pretend to like the almost certainly awful “humor”. It might be an AI because the name “Belf” is unique, in my experience.


[1] I’m only half-kidding. The previous issue featured a book called “Precious Amber”, which was more than a little suspect.